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Thread: RV Solar Kits

  1. #1
    Lucky survivor Seasoned Member Luxeon Star's Avatar
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    RV Solar Kits

    Disable These Ads!
    Here is just one distributor of Recreational Vehicle Solar kits:

    http://www.ul-solar.com/category_s/79.htm

    The 20 watt kit includes:
    20 Watt 12 Volt Solar Panel - 1pcs
    Specialty Concepts ASC 4 amp Charge Controller - 1pcs
    Z-Flat Surface Mounting Kit - 1pcs
    15FT Long Extension Wires ( UL Approved ) - 1pcs

    Cost: $143.99

    For a little more you can get a 60 watt kit: http://www.ul-solar.com/RV_Solar_Pow...060p-rv-cm.htm

    cost: $200.01.

    They have a few other kits also as well as individual solar panels.

    I pieced my 20 watt setup together but I did buy the panel from UL Solar.


    Lux

  2. #2
    Karma caster Contributor
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    Good Long over do stuff...

    Keep it coming man... I know the set up you're speaking about... Nice site BTW..... Emergency solar... we should all try it.
    Jim Crow America relegated Blacks to the back of buses. Israel wants Arabs excluded from the bus entirely.

  3. #3
    Lucky survivor Seasoned Member Luxeon Star's Avatar
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    The heat wave and power outages going on right now in several states got me thinking about this. The 60 watt set up will power 2 of these fans 24/7 with power left over for a little LED lighting:

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/O2-Cool-8-...e-Fan/15992438

    It may be too late this time around but people can get ready for next time.

    By the way, The comments about the fan on the walmart site were interesting.

    Here is a larger version of the same fan. I have at least one of these and a few of the other one also. I have been buying these for the last couple of years when they go on discount at walmart (before the end of summer). I would probably have 10 fans by now but i keep giving them away:

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/O2Cool-10-...Specifications
    Last edited by Luxeon Star; Jul 8th, 2012 at 1:30 AM.

  4. #4
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    Pico? Tom? I can't bump this stuff all by myself.. well I could but help makes the wheel turn easier.
    Jim Crow America relegated Blacks to the back of buses. Israel wants Arabs excluded from the bus entirely.

  5. #5
    GEAUX SAINTS! Contributor pico's Avatar
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    A 20 watt solar panel is not much power at all, and a 60 watt panel will not be much help either for running items. This is very limited power. If you are a bit adventurous and have a little bit of knowledge, you can make your own and perhaps use a lightweight polymer sheet instead of glass... not sure how it would hold up over time, but then also not sure what you are trying to run with the solar power. I think you should think about what you plan to run and go from there.
    I'd Rather Be A Right-Wing Nut Job Then A Liberal With No Nuts And No Job

  6. #6
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    I first saw the idea on serendipity Ideally you'd be using that deep cycle marine/RV batterty to run one appalince at a time... say a radio, or a lap top charger and wifi connection... or a hot plate to boil some water for coffee...

    As I understand the set up is not designed for more than 1 at a time. When desperate this trick could be usful to provide the electricity you must haqve for whatever reasons.
    Jim Crow America relegated Blacks to the back of buses. Israel wants Arabs excluded from the bus entirely.

  7. #7
    GEAUX SAINTS! Contributor pico's Avatar
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    That panel would require a lot of time to recharge even a single car battery, so your usage time would be fairly short, especially since you need to keep a lead based battery like the ones in RV's and cars typically above 70% drained to keep them working over the long haul. The idea of this is great, but perhaps what you need to look at is making a homemade foldout set of panels that could be protected while driving and then unfolded and aimed for better solar capturing. I am making a panel set this weekend, as a matter of fact, that is a foldout setup for emergencies. You would be able to hook up a pair of car batteries to it and it would be a pretty stout 24volt panel that puts out a decent 80+ Watts. A small inverter would be just the ticket to powering up small laptops and broadband routers and such, but remember that if your community has a widespread power outage, chances are your local high speed provider is down too.

    Anyway, this will fold down to be a compact 20"x24" package stacked about 6" thick. Being made from 3/8" tempered glass and aluminum angle bar, it should be strong enough to take a bit of abuse, but the drawback will be the weight. I have seen others made using 2x2 pine lumber primed and painted for the framing and plexiglass sheeting that is made to not fade or yellow and that would cut the weight down, as well as the costs.
    I'd Rather Be A Right-Wing Nut Job Then A Liberal With No Nuts And No Job

  8. #8
    Lucky survivor Seasoned Member Luxeon Star's Avatar
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    Hello Pico,

    I agree with you 100 percent. This is a very small set up. On a sunny summer California day a 60 watt set up only gets you about 240 watt hours a day of power. That is a 100 watt bulb for a little over 2- hours or two 5 watt fans for 24 hours (or more, my 5 watt fan ran 24/7 for weeks with a 20 watt set up.).
    Your few thousand watts of panels proove yet again the right guy won the the AO 2011 most likely to survive award.

    You may be interested to know that a comany called SJH (sino-Japan Heater) makes 12 volt water heater elements. don't bother looking on their web site, they are a build to order heater element company. I e-mailed them to find out if they stocked any of the 12 volt heaters and they don't. Any way I am planning tyo buy one or two of the 300 watt heaters to try doing things like boiling water for cooking and coffee. These are what is known as submersible or submersion heater elements and they must always be submerged in water when they are powered up or the burn out.

    Here is a web site that sells the 600 watt (SJH12600):

    http://www.survivalunlimited.com/diversionloads.htm

    and 300 watt:

    http://www.hydrogenappliances.com/hotwater_wh12but.html

    I also want to try heating up a tank of water, probably 10 callons but maybe as high as 50 gallons. The idea is that in a suvical stuation with below freezing conitions, jus being in a small room with a lot of stored water can keep the room temperature above freezing for days if you have enough water. This is because as the water gets close to freezing it has to give off its stored heat which is quite a bit for water. it requires more energy than just about anything else to raise it's temperature and it gives it all back to freeze. It's counter intuitive to go hit all your cold water and stuff it in the smallest bedroom but it works (ventalation becomes the factor that works against you. So if a person has 300 or more watts of panels they can get over 1000 watt hours of energy to heat some of the water depending on the hours and intensity of sun light each day. I also want to test what i get out of the element running it on only an 80 watt panel.

    More than you probably wanted to know but it may be another way to get some use out of panels in the winter by offsetting your heating bill. The obvious question is why do this instead of running an electric heater. The answer is that it is very efficient in tranfering the energy to the water which at night is like a heat battery giving back energy when the sun is down. Also ir is low voltage and you don't need to make the conversion to 120 or 240 volts.
    The intent of this thread was to provide a simple, inexpensive, one stop shopping solution to a problem that quite recently was an “in your face” / real life situation for millions of people. The 3 biggest problems the average person faced if they lost power this month was probably:
    1. Clean water
    2. Food
    3. Heat

    My suggestion takes the extreme heat situation and turns it into a tolerable camping at home situation.

    I actually have 40 watts of panels on my roof right now and about another 100 watts not installed if I need it. Most people reading this thread probably are not ready to put a few thousand or a few hundred watts of panels on the roof. Besides they probably would not know what to do with them if they did. But you have to start somewhere and in my humble opinion this would be a good start. You can always buy more panels later and having a little redundancy is a good thing.

    In regard to charging up the battery, I just let my 20 watt set up run all the tme so the battery is always charged. I am running a little bit of led lighting off of it. The 5 watt setup is used as needed to charge up another car battery which I use primarily to charge up a flashlight (totally overkill). The 10 watt panel runs a small attic fan and in a long term power outage that panel would run a couple of fans during the day so I would have 3 fans running during the day and one at night without having to put the 80 watt on the roof. In other words I am always good to go (to go camping).

    The problem with this thread is that the millions of people who are now ready or should be ready to make sure they don’t have to spend another sweaty, stinky, miserable week with no relief from the heat if this happens to them again, is that they are not in touch with this information. They need to know about it but they don’t know they need to know. So to help them find it I have included some tags below to help them gooogle an yayooo their way over here.

    Free power to beat the heat Make your own power at home Dirt cheap summer cooling Cool off during power outage Escape the heat Better than cold fusion Cheap solar fan Off the grid Energy independence Homemade power DIY web bot solar Ure nostradamus tax break dwp power line frying hot summer outage teotwawki fubar shtf snafu grid Kuantimiatsu Kuan ti miatsu
    Last edited by Luxeon Star; Jul 18th, 2012 at 2:11 AM.

  9. #9
    GEAUX SAINTS! Contributor pico's Avatar
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    I read you loud and clear amigo. I had picked up a few thousand watts worth of solar cells when evergreen went thru financial woes, so I have a lot of homemade solar power capability. Running much of the common household appliances/items off of even a few thousand watts system will still cause drainage if not careful, so switching over to low power consumption appliances should be a priority as well for anyone thinking of going off grid.
    I'd Rather Be A Right-Wing Nut Job Then A Liberal With No Nuts And No Job

  10. #10
    Lucky survivor Seasoned Member Luxeon Star's Avatar
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    Your few thousand watts of panels proove yet again the right guy won the the AO 2011 most likely to survive award.

    You may be interested to know that a comany called SJH (sino-Japan Heater) makes 12 volt water heater elements. don't bother looking on their web site, they are a build to order heater element company. I e-mailed them to find out if they stocked any of the 12 volt heaters and they don't. Any way I am planning to buy one or two of the 300 watt heaters to try doing things like boiling water for cooking and coffee. These are what is known as submersible or submersion heater elements and they must always be submerged in water when they are powered up or the burn out.

    Here is a web site that sells the 600 watt (SJH12600):

    http://www.survivalunlimited.com/diversionloads.htm

    and 300 watt:

    http://www.hydrogenappliances.com/hotwater_wh12but.html

    I also want to try heating up a tank of water, probably 10 gallons but maybe as high as 50 gallons. The idea is that in a survival situation with below freezing conitions, just being in a small room with a lot of stored water can keep the room temperature above freezing for days if you have enough water. This is because as the water gets close to freezing it has to give off its stored heat which is quite a bit for water. it requires more energy than just about anything else to raise it's temperature and it gives it all back to freeze. It's counter intuitive to go get all your cold water and stuff it in the smallest bedroom but it works (ventalation then becomes the factor that works against you). So if a person has 300 or more watts of panels they can get over 1000 watt hours of energy to heat some of the water depending on the hours and intensity of sun light each day. I also want to test what i get out of the element running it on only an 80 watt panel.

    More than you probably wanted to know but it may be another way to get some use out of panels in the winter by offsetting your heating bill. The obvious question is why do this instead of running an electric heater off of solar panels. The answer is that it is very efficient in tranfering the energy to the water which at night is like a heat battery giving back energy when the sun is down. Also it is low voltage and you don't need to make the conversion to 120 or 240 volts. In your case you probably have lots of watts to spare but getting heat at night would still require some lead acid batteries.

  11. #11
    GEAUX SAINTS! Contributor pico's Avatar
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    yeah, i have seen those water heater elements and will likely be converting from gas to electric if I get a full blown pv system up and running for my home. I would likely opt for the 24volt variety, or maybe even 48 volt, but for a small pv system the 12 volt is prolly the best way to go and definitely the cheapest.

    If your water heater is electric, consider also adding a timer to it. These are not feasible for gas systems, but are clearly worth the money for electric based water heaters... and of course wrap them with at least an R-11 insulating wrap.
    I'd Rather Be A Right-Wing Nut Job Then A Liberal With No Nuts And No Job

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